Take Action Against Depression

February 28, 2017

Researchers have found that most everyone will go through some period of mental illness, and depression is one common form.

Here’s something that could help: some evidence suggests that depression might be a symptom of your brain wanting you to take action to solve a problem (or let it go). It pairs well with other research saying that setting and meeting small goals can temporarily relieve symptoms of depression.

So take charge, and form new habits. It might help you to lift your mood, or it will just help you to get things done.

Where to begin? If you’re feeling fairly passive about things, make your first task getting a little extra support from colloidal gold. It’s reported to boost mental functions like memory and focus—the perfect building blocks for building new habits.

Next pick something small, like a daily chore. Then two. Then tackle bigger and bigger projects, until you’re meeting life goals (and track your progress in photos or words so you can look back and see how far you’ve come!).

Alternately, tackle a big problem one small piece at a time. It’s exactly like the old joke, “how do you eat an airplane? One bite at a time”. Start by mapping it out in whatever way works for you, whether you’re visual and want a flowchart or whether you just want a clean list or some other representation. Then pick things off it, and give yourself a pat on the back every time you cross a part off.

The idea from the studies is twofold, that you get short term benefits from anything you can get done, and you build new habits that can put you on a new path in the long term.

Like all illness, of course there are multiple reasons for depression. If motivation and accomplishment aren’t central to you, don’t give up. There are lots of things to try. In the meantime, get some extra support from colloidal gold or D.S.A. MGRx.

If you think you’re depressed, see a doctor. Professional supervision can help keep symptoms from getting worse, and they can spot other complications.

What do you think of this new research? How much merit does it have?

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