A New STI is Quickly Becoming Antibiotic Resistant

July 13, 2018

It may have been discovered in the 1980s, but a diagnostic test was only developed in the last year, and you’ve probably never heard of it—it’s mycoplasma genitalium.

Mycoplasma genitalium is an STI. Like most STIs, there’s been a boost in transmission as the world has grown smaller thanks to the internet. With vague symptoms, doctors are prone to mistreating mycoplasma genitalium, leading to it developing antibiotic resistance—a growing problem among all STIs, but especially one the general public is unfamiliar with.

Here’s what you need to know: most people have minor, generic symptoms like painful urination. Women might experience bleeding after sex, and men might have watery discharge. What’s concerning is that untreated, it can cause inflammation in the genitals/pelvis, and infertility.

What you need to do: use a barrier method for protection. Bring any unusual pelvic issues to the attention of your doctor. Find a clinic that features mycoplasma genitalium on it’s STI panel, so that you aren’t accidentally treated for a UTI or chlamydia instead, making the infection stronger.

Even if you think you’re low risk, don’t chance it. Bad surprises are the worst ones, and you never know where life will bring you. Take Hepatitis C, for example. An entire generation (those born mid 40s to early 60s) is high risk, even if they weren’t exposed to more traditional risk factors, and needs to be tested. Over the last three plus decades, who knows when and where mycoplasma genitalium spread!

Make sure that you’re as strong as possible for any unexpected infection, and keep your health up in other ways, too. Sleeping, eating well, exercising, avoiding stress, and using supporting supplements like colloidal silver.

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