Autumn Allergies In High Gear

November 11, 2014

Woman With Fall LeavesTrees are bare, which means fall leaves are molding, and dust mites, ragweed, and a few other allergens are causing allergies. Most people don’t realise how bad fall allergies are because they spend less time outside, not because the allergens aren’t there.

But spending time outside is good in the fall. You’ll get sneaky exercise, and some Vitamin D to fight off seasonal depression.

You also need to make sure you diagnose yourself right—because fall is also cold and flu season. A stuffy, runny nose can mean you’re sick, or it can mean you have allergies (ragweed is incredibly common—almost everyone has it to some degree). How do you know the difference? Check for a fever. It’s the biggest indicator of infection.

And be warned: allergies can lead to a cold, so while you might be sure it’s allergies, it could soon be a cold, too. Mucus can clog your nose and allow a sinus infection to take root. Post nasal drip can spread pathogens into your throat, leading to bronchitis or pneumonia. Or it can just irritate your throat until it’s sore.

Here’s some good news, you’re first line of defense against allergies is also a natural one: a sinus rinse. Do it daily, if your allergies are severe, or as needed. Not only will it help relieve symptoms like a runny nose and congestion, but it can be used as prevention by washing away allergens that stick in your nose.

Remember: it’s never safe to do a sinus rinse with straight tap water. You can either boil and cool it, use purified water and salt, or use colloidal silver (which is available in a handy, dandy sinus flooding kit with everything you need to get started, including instructions!).

Have you noticed fall allergies? What triggers them the most?

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