Breathe Deeply

February 25, 2016

Lung XRayI think it’s a tough call which organ is the most under-appreciated. I think there’s a good case for the lungs—breathing isn’t a conscious decision. There aren’t many major diseases that strike them randomly, so lungs don’t get their own month. And even if you don’t think about your liver or pancreas often, you know about diabetes, Hep C, and other diseases that can get to them.

When you really should think about your lungs, when you’re sick with a cold or the flu, it’s too overwhelming to. There’s the fog of pain, illness, and figuring out how to get better. But that’s when you should be giving your lungs attention. During a head cold, full-blown full, or even just a sinus infection, you can end up with a lung infection. With the bronchial tubes clogged up, building up bacteria. Even with pneumonia taking hold.

Have a plan in place for when you get sick to support your lungs.

Make sure you have a broad strategy, like immune support from colloidal silver. Lungs or not, it’s not fun being sick. Rest, clear fluids, nutrition (and plenty of eating for energy) also help speed along getting better.

Then start with a way to clear out mucus, like one (or two, since people share illnesses when they share homes) of our sinus flooding kits. Mucus is one of the ways that germs spread to your lungs—it drips down the back of your throat, or gets sniffled in, or just builds up around your tonsils until your lungs are hacking their way through it. So clear the mucus out early and often when you’re sick. Rinse or flood your sinuses, keep your mouth clean, and if it starts to build up despite your best efforts (and fatigue), go to plan B.

Get some of that support directly into your lungs with the moist, supporting air that a nebulizer provides. Nebulizers are available to everyone for lung support—so don’t miss out on such a handy tool.

Fight with every tool in your box for that extra support. Keep illness from snowballing by being proactive about your health—especially at the first sign of illness!

A note about sinus rinsing, and putting anything in a nebulizer: don’t use tap water. If you boil and cool it, you can use it in a sinus rinse, but it’s still not safe for nebulizing. Distilled or purified water is okay—just read the label, since some brands are actually just tap water. If you want an always safe option (barring allergies), stick with colloidal silver.

Share your favorite tips to clear the mucus with us in the comments:

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