Do You Have Athlete’s Foot?

August 5, 2019

It’s a common infection, and the symptoms may not be what you think. At any given time an estimated 1 in 4 people have Athlete’s Foot. With a range of symptoms, that persistent peculiarity may actually be a result of this common, treatable illness. Here’s how you can avoid and treat Athlete’s Foot with help from colloidal silver.

It’s summer time, so there’s a good chance you’re barefoot more often than normal. And if you’re not barefoot, there’s a good chance you’re sweating in your shoes from the long heatwave we’ve had. Both give you a chance of picking up Athlete’s Foot. Going barefoot allows you to collect an infection—from gym or shower floor, around the pool, or having an injury on your skin or nails. Shoes create the perfect breeding ground for fungi—dark, moist, and a collection of dead skin.

So what are Athlete’s Foot symptoms? Do you have Athlete’s Foot?

You may have just one Athlete’s Foot symptom, or you may have many. Stronger immune systems may fight them off, or you may have decent foot maintenance but a persistent strain. In any case, symptoms of Athlete’s Foot include: itching or burning (especially between toes or on the soles of your feet), blisters, dry skin, cracked or peeling skin, discolored or peeling toenails, or toenails that are either too thick or too brittle. Again, you may have one symptom, a few symptoms of Athlete’s Foot, or many.

Preventing Athlete’s Foot comes down to care: avoiding touching things other people’s feet have touched (with as many as 1 in 4 having Athlete’s Foot and more potentially carrying with no symptoms, there’s risk everywhere), keep your own feet clean and free of dead skin, and keeping feet dry. You can help stop your shoes from being hotbeds of odor and germs by freshening them up with Smelly Shoe Spray.

If you do think you have Athlete’s Foot, you can naturally treat it. Start with a foot bath (using sea salt) and gently remove any dead skin. A pumice stone after a foot bath is the best way—metal graters cause microabrasions that might encourage further infection, and some of those acid foot peels have nasty ingredients (so read up carefully or just avoid all together).

Natural antimicrobials like garlic, tea tree oil, and colloidal silver can be a part of naturally treating Athlete’s Foot. It’s also important to keep feet dry—baking soda, baby powder made from corn starch, and wicking socks and shoes are good tools.

If you have Athlete’s Foot, be proactive about naturally treating it before it spreads.

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