Dog Flu Spreading!

April 24, 2015

Dog And Doctor DogIf you dismissed dog flu last week because it was just in the Chicago area, listen up! It’s now spread through the rest of Illinois, Wisconsin, Ohio, and Indiana. Thousands of dogs are now sick.

And given how far it’s spread in a week, I’d expect it to continue spreading. Let’s get ahead of this thing!

First:

Just like with humans, dogs with weaker immune systems (the very young and old, or those with a disease like heartworm) are the most at risk for serious consequences like death, but this strain is highly virulent, so all dogs could get sick.

Unlike humans, you can’t really wash the dog parts that touch things and get shared socially. I mean… the sniffing, rolling, sneezing, and playing that’s a part of every dog’s repertoire means that if one dog has it, it will be shared.

Prevention:

Keep dogs at home, or at least away from areas frequented by other dogs. If your dog has a weakened immune system, I’d take things one step further. When you have guests over, put puppy away, or have them wash their hands (same as they would when visiting a baby or elderly family member.) Humans can also spread dog flu between dogs.

Do a little extra cleaning after visitors, too, since surfaces can spread dog flu.

Need dog care? Check a site like care.com for in-home or drop-by care, rather than a kennel. Kennels are a hot spot for disease transmission (and although similar to canine cough, canine flu is more virulent and serious!).

And of course, Immune Support!

Just like humans, you can support pets’ immune systems with colloidal silver. It just takes a small amount in their water bowl each day. *This is really great for all outdoor pets—including cats).

Signs of Dog Flu:

If you think your beloved Spot was exposed to dog flu, watch for symptoms for 2 weeks and keep Spot quarantined.

Contact a vet if you observe: coughing, lethargy, refusal to eat, or fever.

Dog flu runs about 1 month, so expect this outbreak to last a while.

Can humans get dog flu?

Humans and cats can’t—currently. But as with bird and swine flu, close exposure (caring for a sick pet, bathing, getting “kisses”, picking up poo) may lead to the first case eventually. And since humans live in close proximity with dogs, mutation is even more likely than with bird or swine flu.

Best bet? Keep your immune system strong, too! Just add a little colloidal silver to your daily routine.

Share your thoughts and prevention ideas in the comments:

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Dog Flu Continues To Spread — Colloids For Life Blog
July 27, 2015 at 6:02 am

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