Fortify Yourself, And Your Home, With Natural Antibiotics

June 24, 2013

Mint TeaThere’s lots of things in nature that are naturally antimicrobial, that naturally deter pests, and that are easy to incorporate into your life and home.

Outside

-Mint, sage, eucalyptus… these won’t just make your garden smell nice, they’ll deter mice and other pests from coming around. Plant borders around your home, in the bottom of window wells, or just in areas that are less well tended. Mint and sage are both plants that you start from cuttings. Check local laws before planting eucalyptus—in some areas, it’s a weed.

Bonus—You can use mint and sage in your cooking, or as tea for their health benefits.

Mint can be made into a tummyache tea, or drank to relax muscles (it will also help clear your sinuses). Use your already steeped leaves on any acne—they’re naturally antimicrobial. Mash leaves with olive oil and apply to temples for headache relief.

Sage tea is also known as “thinker’s tea” because it can help sharpen your mind and brighten your mood. It’s a good source of B-Vitamins, Vitamins A and C, and minerals like potassium, calcium, and iron. Sage is also great to cook with—make a pasta sauce by heating some olive oil, then browning some sausage, and warming (until fragrant) some garlic and sage leaves.

Of course, nutritional value will vary based on your soil. Always talk to your doctor/pharmacist before drinking tea or changing your diet.

Don’t have a green thumb? Try candles (or incense—make your own by drying and rolling sage). The scented smoke will keep pests away from your outdoor gathering, or place it in windows to keep them out!

Indoors

As mentioned above, there are plenty of great herbs to use in the kitchen with antimicrobial properties.

There are also plenty to use in the bathroom, like witch hazel. Most natural beauty products will contain at least one as an active ingredient, but if you’re ambitious you can copy their ingredients and make your own.

Brass, copper, and other metals make for self-sterilizing door handles.

Of course, the strongest antimicrobial agent you can bring into your home is probably silver. Few people use silver plated utensils for anything more than major holidays, but you can add a little silver to your life with a colloidal silver supplement. Besides taking it to support your immune system, you can get creative with it around your house.

A spray in your leftovers makes them last a little longer,

A drop in your humidifier during cold season,

Or copy an antimicrobial/anti-stink product and DIY (after all, how many washes before the ionic silver it was made with is all gone?). Try spraying your gym shoes before and after use, or the wet bag pocket of your gym bag!

What other ways can you incorporate antimicrobial products into your life?

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