More than 1 in 5 Get Sick from Planes

May 11, 2017

Planning a vacation? Better pack your immune support. Some estimates say that as many as 20% of commercial airline passengers will develop a respiratory illness within the week after flying. That includes coughs, sinus infections, runny noses, or worse. Not included in that 20% and adding to the pile of ill travelers is variations of stomach illness that can get picked up along the way (without even eating anything).

There are two routes of transmission going on that you need to avoid.

Airplanes already have a reputation for being dirty. Studies have pinpointed frequently used but not really cleaned parts like buckles, tray tables, and the armrests as particularly germy. You can use baby wipes or sanitizer if you’re going on a long flight, but the big thing is to avoid touching your face (dirty hands to eyes, nose, and mouth is a big route of transmission). Then wash your hands at every opportunity.

But what about the 1 in 5 people coming down with some sort of cough or other virus? That’s where the immune support really comes in. When you get on a plane you’re stepping out of the germs you know from home, work, and your community to get in close quarters with a bunch of people carrying new germs. Chances are, someone’s going to be sick, but even if not, it’s still putting pressure on your immune system. If someone is carrying a virus, everyone within about three feet will be exposed to it (and that exposure will be in addition to the immune stress of the new germs, altered sleep patterns and meal patterns to travel, and the stress of flying).

Colloidal silver is a great way to support your immune system, and easy to take with you in your checked luggage to keep the immune support going through your whole holiday. Make sure that your trips are fun and productive, not tiring.

Leave us a comment about what you think the hardest part of travel is:

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