In a Large Crowd? Watch for Measles and Mumps

March 16, 2018

Mumps and measles are both out there still—exposure from other, less vaccinated countries made it into unvaccinated pockets of the US, and now it’s a thing again. The good news is that vaccination may protect against some of the more severe symptoms, if not the disease itself (measles vaccination is pretty tight at 97+%, while mumps leaves room for the average person to get it at only 88% effective, nevermind people with chronic conditions/weakened immune systems).

How would you get mumps or measles? No longer a childhood disease, an infected person could be anywhere, and if a vaccinated adult still gets a disease, they could have minimal or no symptoms to show. The biggest risk is large gatherings, from the rare convention or competition to the more common event of heading to the airport for a flight. If a risk is identified, people exposed are warned and monitored. But what if there are only mild symptoms?

In fact, mild measles looks like any viral illness with a sore throat, runny nose, and fever. Mumps may not present with traditional warning signs either, most people get fever, aches, and loss of appetite, and may only get the classic swollen “mumps” glands a few weeks after being infected/contagious.

Mumps and measles are both airborne illnesses. Mumps is as contagious as the flu, and measles is even more contagious. While vaccinated people are low risk, you could still be one of the 3 in 100 who are still at risk for measles, or 12 in 100 at risk for mumps.

It boils down to awareness, so you can prevent severe mumps or measles symptoms, and standard precautions like frequent hand-washing, taking good care of yourself, and avoiding sick people.

You can also support your immune system with colloidal silver, and be a little more prepared for the swirl of germs that we seem to be living in these days!
n a Large Crowd? Watch for Measles and Mumps

Mumps and measles are both out there still—exposure from other, less vaccinated countries made it into unvaccinated pockets of the US, and now it’s a thing again. The good news is that vaccination may protect against some of the more severe symptoms, if not the disease itself (measles vaccination is pretty tight at 97+%, while mumps leaves room for the average person to get it at only 88% effective, nevermind people with chronic conditions/weakened immune systems).

How would you get mumps or measles? No longer a childhood disease, an infected person could be anywhere, and if a vaccinated adult still gets a disease, they could have minimal or no symptoms to show. The biggest risk is large gatherings, from the rare convention or competition to the more common event of heading to the airport for a flight. If a risk is identified, people exposed are warned and monitored. But what if there are only mild symptoms?

In fact, mild measles looks like any viral illness with a sore throat, runny nose, and fever. Mumps may not present with traditional warning signs either, most people get fever, aches, and loss of appetite, and may only get the classic swollen “mumps” glands a few weeks after being infected/contagious.

Mumps and measles are both airborne illnesses. Mumps is as contagious as the flu, and measles is even more contagious. While vaccinated people are low risk, you could still be one of the 3 in 100 who are still at risk for measles, or 12 in 100 at risk for mumps.

It boils down to awareness, so you can prevent severe mumps or measles symptoms, and standard precautions like frequent hand-washing, taking good care of yourself, and avoiding sick people.

You can also support your immune system with colloidal silver, and be a little more prepared for the swirl of germs that we seem to be living in these days!

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