Measles and Mumps, Oh My!

February 27, 2018

Outbreaks of once quashed viruses are increasingly common, so who needs to worry? And how should we prepare?

Truth is, the answer is more or less the same as for anything: people with weakened immune systems need to worry the most, while everyone else just need general caution. One of the ways you can help prepare for exposure is to support your immune system with good health habits and an immune supporting supplement like colloidal silver.

So where are these outbreaks? Right now, lack of vaccination has caused a huge measles outbreak in Europe, Australia also gets frequent outbreaks of measles, and there are large pockets of mumps outbreaks everywhere. How could these come to you? Well, airplanes and travel have made the world a very small place. For example, an Australian tourist recently spread measles all over New York.

Don’t ignore an outbreak just because you’re vaccinated. The measles vaccine is one of the most effective at 97%, but if your life has changed—you’ve developed a chronic illness like diabetes or a lifestyle habit like drinking alcohol frequently—your immune system may not be up to the task. The mumps vaccine is less effective at 88%, and may have worn off if you’re an adult, which has been contributing to the spread of mumps. Areas with outbreaks are letting at risk individuals get a boost from a third dose of MMR (like healthcare workers). The vaccinations can also lessen symptoms, but you could still be contagious (this is a problem with whooping cough: adults who are vaccinated are spreading the disease silently).

Once common childhood illnesses, measles and mumps are very contagious. Like flu, if there’s an outbreak in your area you have a very good chance of catching it from the waiting room of your doctor’s office or the ER, so use those nurse helplines and think hard about what you want from your doctor (some doctors will prescribe medications for contagious illnesses like pink eye over the phone to avoid spreading it). Remember that viral illnesses, common during winter months, can only be helped by rest, not antibiotics.

If you want to boost your immune system, skip the gimmicky trash on the end caps of grocery stores. It’s expensive and low quality compared to high quality supplements that you could be taking regularly for a steady supply of health support, rather than an emergency boost.

Support your immune system instead by taking care of yourself consistently with exercise, a good diet and daily multivitamin (like Vita One), plenty of quality sleep, and even immune system support from colloidal silver.

Have you had an outbreak near you? How did it go?

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