Over A Year of Salmonella-Turkey

February 20, 2019

No one source of Salmonella has been found since the start of raw turkey being recalled at the end of 2017, and new cases are still being reported despite recalls and other actions. Here’s what you need to know and how to stay safe from Salmonella.

No turkey is safe. All across the nation, most or possibly all raw turkey products are playing whack-a-mole with Salmonella.

Ideally, Salmonella would not be in our food supply—but you can minimize your risk by following food safety tips including frequently washing hands when handling food; cleaning anything that touches raw meat AND a wide area around it; and cooking food to food safe temperatures (letting it rest before cutting also helps with this in addition to being practical preparation advice).

What are food poisoning symptoms from Salmonella? Symptoms of Salmonella infection start between 12 and 72 hours after exposure. Then come stomach cramps, vomiting, diarrhea, and general nausea.

You can’t always prevent exposure. Be prepared by supporting your immune system with a healthy diet that includes probiotics, and with colloidal silver.

With turkey infected Salmonella everywhere, why aren’t there more cases? Even though a growing number of people are reporting illness from Salmonella infected turkey products, the overall number is still relatively low. Chances are, not everyone who’s exposed gets sick, or sick enough to report it. Those getting sick, really sick, are likely those with the weakest immune systems.

Having a weak immune system can be a chronic problem, because of stress, other illnesses, or genetics. But, having a weakened immune system can also be a one-off—just a bad day for your body. Not sleeping, recovering from illness, a few skipped or unhealthy meals.

Focusing on health basics like diet, sleep, exercise and nutrition can help prevent an off day, as can supporting your immune system with colloidal silver.

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