Relative Size: Blood Cells, Bacteria, Viruses, And Nano Particles

June 29, 2011

The immune system, as well as many processes of the human body at the cellular level, can be hard to understand since until recently the technology was unavailable to really SEE what’s happening. Blood cells, bacteria, viruses, and nano particles (like those in colloidal silver) are all very tiny…but are still relatively different in size!

The Immune System In Action! Here’s a video of a white blood cell chasing down bacteria (specifically: Staphylococcus aureus):



Notice how much larger the white blood cell is to the bacteria! To better understand the relative size difference, you can go to this site, and compare a dust mite (relatively large), to a white blood cell (smaller), to red blood cells (smaller), to bacteria (smaller) to viruses (tiny)!

Rhinovirus, the smallest pahtogen in the site’s example, measures about 20 nanometers in diameter. The particles in true colloidal silvers are about .65 nanometers in diameter!

To further understand how small a nanometer is: on average, fingernails grow 1 nanometer per second. Or, a nanometer is about 1 million times smaller than an ant!

When you understand how small silver nanoparticles are, it’s easier to understand why tests have shown that they easily exit the body (sutdy—download). It’s also understandable why some people are concerned about nano particles (including nano silver) and human health and the environment: they’re so small, it’s hard (& expensive) to have a complete understanding of what’s happening!

So far tests haven’t found negative effects of nano silver (including argyria), but testing will continue as nano silver enters the market in food and household products, and replaces chemicals in antimicrobial roles (replacing pesticides, etc.!).

What questions do you have about the immune system and its different cells? Would you like to see more videos like this? Leave your feedback below!

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