Stay Active Against Mosquitoes This Summer

July 22, 2015

forest Path“Above average rainfall” has hit many parts of the US this summer, leaving health officials concerned that it’s going to be another year with lost of West Nile Virus outbreaks.

As much as a cool summer evening is the perfect time to enjoy the outdoors, beware mosquitoes. That means places they breed, times they come out to feed, and what a bite could mean.

Prevention: Get Rid Of Breeding Grounds

Water pools—especially when it rains a lot and the ground is saturated. Head outside after a rain to see where water is hanging around. A wheel barrow? A small indent? A playground, patio furniture, or other cool yard object? Move them into a shed, drain them, fill in the hole. Get rid of all the still water where mosquitoes can lay their eggs (some mosquitoes hatch in as little as 24 hours, so don’t count on being available everytime it rains to clear things off!).

Then there’s water features: pools, fountains, bird baths, dog bowls. Proper maintenance is all you need. Properly chlorinated pools (with salt even), running fountains with clean water, and clean, fresh dog (and cat) bowls and bird baths. When you’re watering your garden, just use the hose to freshen the water, and empty fountains if you’ll be gone for an extended period.

For dog bowls and bird baths, consider adding a spritz of colloidal silver to help keep water fresh, and to support your animal’s immune systems. Lyme disease, bird flu, and so much more is going around this summer.

Vigilance: Watch For Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn. Usually experts advise to stay indoors at those times, but who wants to miss a summer sunset? Instead, wear bug spray, light citronella candles, wear long sleeves and pants (try linens if it’s hot), and adjust your plans if that doesn’t keep the buggers away.

Your body chemistry, including your blood type and what you eat, can make you either delicious or repellant to mosquitoes, so environmental changes may only go so far.

After Math: Watch Your Health

While most people feel the itch of a mosquito bite, some don’t, so give yourself a once over after spending time outside in evening or early mornings. If you get bit, in about 2 weeks (or as many as 8) you’ll need to watch or health changes (put the bite on your calendar two months out so you’ll remember to report it to your doctor. A faster diagnosis is always better. Record the location of the bite, too).

Most people with West Nile are at risk for fatigue, fever, headache, and muscle ache—but people with weakened immune systems (the very young or old, those with another underlying condition, etc.) are at risk for neurological problems as well.

Give your immune system extra support with colloidal silver, extra rest, good food, and staying hydrated.

What places have you found around the yard that might attract mosquitoes?

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