Summer Health Checklist: Pet Edition

April 8, 2016

Woman and her happy outside dogSpring is here, and warm summer weather is just around the corner. Kids are already counting down to the end of the school year. Warm weekends are tempting us outside to hike, ride, and play.

And our pets are just as excited. More walks! More bugs, rabbits, and other critters to chase! More smells! Warm water to splash in!

But summer can pose a number of health problems, just like it can for humans. So make sure to take a few minutes to prevent as many as you can!

-Heat is the biggest risk. Right now it’s temperate and lovely in Colorado, and I’m seeing lots of dogs in cars around town. Don’t get into the habit, though, because it’s only getting warmer, and too much heat can quickly turn fatal (or just cause lots of damage). Cracking a window isn’t enough, nor is leaving a little bit of water. Make good arrangements for your pets when you’re out and about, or just leave them home. (And remember, you can get tickets or worse depending on your city’s laws).

-Speaking of water: keep a fresh bowl outside for your outdoor pets. Keyword here is fresh, because mosquitoes are going to be a problem this year with all the tropical diseases they spread. Dump and replace it at least daily!

(Two tips here, too: adding ice can help keep it cool for pets, and can even be a treat. Adding a few drops of colloidal silver can help fight germ growth and keep it fresh all day).

-Spend 20 minutes or so learning about plants, dogs, and maybe larger wildlife in your area. If you like going on walks, what larger animals might your dog encounter if he goes off leash? What plants should you ban from your yard, lest a curious pup much them? (I once knew a pug who loved marigolds, snapdragons, and grass). And what bugs could pose a risk if your dog or cat catches and eats one?

-Speaking of bugs—dogs can get Lyme Disease from ticks and West Nile from mosquitoes, same as humans. If you’re going into a bug-y area, be sure to share the bug spray with your pets. And you can share your colloidal silver immune support, too (they only need a small amount!).

-And make sure you know all about your breed: some dogs have too much fur for some climates, and get hot more easily than others. Other dogs have too little fur, and can actually sunburn! Your vet can point you in the right direction.

-Finally, practice vehicular safety. Most dogs are ok at swimming, but not all dogs can make it to land if they fall in far enough from it. And in cars, dogs need to be secured (at the very least for your own protection). You can secure a crate, or buy a special seatbelt add on. If you’re taking an airplane, talk to the airlines and explore your options a bit—some don’t keep pets in temperate conditions.

What are your summer pet tips?

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