The Truth About Colloidal Silver

March 28, 2014

ResearchThis week I stumbled on some other brands’ literature about their “colloidal” silver products, and… it was a hot mess. I want to address some of the claims out there, but I’m leery to either link or quote directly, because what I read was so convoluted I don’t even know how to fix it for them.

So, some broad strokes:

How do you know who’s telling the truth? Especially when everyone is just saying the opposite of each other?

1) Google some identifiable facts—not anything about colloidal silver. For instance, you can google about colloids. Colloids are a suspension of particles in water. Those particles will reflect light, so you will see the suspension (it won’t be clear). If it IS clear, it’s not a suspension, it’s a solution. Wikipedia can tell all about suspensions and solutions, for instance, and you can see that that much is true. (You may also get flashes of high school chemistry and realize which is right).

2) Click through to studies. When we find real, properly published studies, we link to them (and I always try and link to the study, not the news article if I can). One of our competitors put links in to studies about how great ionic silver was and how bad nano silver/true colloids were—but they were studies about things like why hair turns gray when you age, nothing about colloidal silver! I’d clicked through and found a massive deception!

3) Here’s another thing you can google: fancy science terms and instructions to use fancy science gadgets. One site is telling you to verify it’s product using X scientific equipment… but it’s telling you to use the equipment wrong, and for the wrong measurement. You can pretty quickly find out if they’re making random stuff up by reading a short paragraph or two about the equipment, and not taking their word on how to use it (for example, imagine being told a thermometer measures how much salt is in something…. not hard to read how a thermometer works and figure out how wrong that statement is!).

4) Something sold in, made in America is pretty reliably not poisoned. Yeah, there are manufacturers of ionic silver solutions (I didn’t look too closely at their product, I hope that’s what it was, I’m inferring a bit) claiming actual colloids are made up of any number of horrible toxins. Because when you have an inferior product, you can’t spare any lie to try and trick people into buying it. It should be pretty obvious you can’t sell something with cyanide in it without people noticing—so this claim is a pretty blatant lie! (The desperation of it almost makes me feel bad for them. Almost.)

Want to learn more about real colloidal silver? Click here!

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