About A Virus: RSV

August 23, 2013

Like so many illnesses, Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is most dangerous for the very old and very young. Most infants get RSV—but unlike chicken pox (which most kids used to get) you don’t get lifelong immunity from RSV. In fact, most people get RSV every 5 or so years. And if you have a weakened immune system? You could get it twice a year!

RSV is the virus behind several diseases: sinus infections, lower respiratory tract infections, and other respiratory infections and their complications. There’s no medication or treatment your doctor can prescribe you, but for those with severe RSV symptoms you might require a hospital stay where they will do what they can to support your lung function and supply oxygen.

For everyone else, rest, fluids, and natural support are all you’ve got. For example, you might enjoy a steamy shower, depending on where your infection is. Steam can really help loosen up the mucus in a sinus infection. Then you can do a sinus rinse (colloidal silver is a great liquid to use—especially if you live in the south where parasites have been popping up in tap water, or if you just want to general benefit of naturally antimicrobial colloidal silver). If you have a deeper infection, try a nebulizer with your colloidal silver.

Of course, prevention is always your best bet. For most of the US, winter is RSV season (the cold, wetter months). Symptoms resemble that of a cold, and are mild for most people. That means if you have a weakened immune system, or someone with a weakened immune system in your life, you have to take those mild illnesses more seriously.

How does transmission of RSV occur? Surfaces. That means 1) Sneeze and cough into elbows, not hands 2) Wash your hands frequently, and avoid touching your face, 3) Clean surfaces frequently—counters, desks, etc., 4) Keep sick people out of the kitchen.

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