Exercise May Not Help Chronic Fatigue Patients

October 4, 2017

Research is pretty clear: for patients of Chronic Disease Syndrome, exercise probably won’t help, it might even do harm.

Exercise is generally talked about as a panacea, as preventing everything from cancer, to insomnia, to depression, but when it comes to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, exercise (despite years of doctors recommending otherwise) may do more harm than good.

If you do want to stay healthy with exercise but you have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, keep your level of exertion below the place where you start breathing hard. Some with CFS may have trouble with anaerobic exercise, where it triggers more severe Chronic Fatigue symptoms. Basically, exercise isn’t forbidden, just keep it simple so you can reap the health benefits without bumping up against Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Unfortunately, some doctors, especially the ones who think Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is mostly mind based, push intense exercise regimens. The doctors who treat Chronic Fatigue Syndrome say that they have years of anecdotes supporting this new research on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

So what can people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome do to boost their energy?

Sleep as needed. It might be frustrating, but sleep supports the body healing from infection, wounds, and more, plus it’s when your brain reboots itself. More sleep can eventually lead to a boost in energy.

Nutrition is key too. Giving your body a varied array of nutrients as well as an optimum amount of healthy protein/grains means it always has the best pool of building blocks and can operate more efficiently.

For daily support, try colloidal gold. It’s reported to boost mood and energy, as well as hand-eye coordination, focus, memory and more.

What helps pr triggers your Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

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