Lyme Disease Prevention Critical

December 16, 2013

Tick ImageA new report has revealed three unexpected deaths: all young, all from undiagnosed Lyme Disease which lead to complications.

Normally, I talk about how having a weakened immune system leaves you at risk for serious complications from otherwise non-serious illnesses (it’s unusual to die from Lyme Disease), but there’s a rare risk to having a naturally strong/youthful immune system: symptoms are so minor they’re ignored or masked by being mostly healthy.

The three people who died of Lyme Disease all had carditis, or heart inflammation, which can happen if Lyme Disease is left untreated for a long time. (Other possible symptoms of untreated Lyme Disease: joint pain, headaches, personality changes).

Local governments in the northeast, where Lyme Disease is a growing problem, have been working to raise public awareness. Basically, wear long sleeves and pants when you’re outdoors in warm weather, and check yourself and pets for ticks when you come inside. Stay away from wildlife, and discourage them from coming in your yard.

The sooner you remove a tick, the lower your chances of getting Lyne Disease. If the tick was engorged, some doctors recommend a short prescription of antibiotics to further decrease risk of Lyme Disease transmission.

You can strengthen your immune system with colloidal silver, a natural supplement. Standard Lyme Disease treatment is at least one round of antibiotics, but not everyone is relieved of Lyme Disease symptoms and doctors limit treatment to 1 month, since it’s considered ineffective after that. Ongoing symptoms can include joint pain and headache. While most people respond well to treatment, complimentary immune support from colloidal silver won’t hurt. Just make sure you are still getting a good source of antibiotics regularly.

There’s also some evidence that people who get Lyme Disease once are more likely to get it again (might be lifestyle, might be a predisposition by the immune system). If you suddenly have a recurrence of Lyme Disease symptoms, see a doctor before assuming it’s chronic Lyme Disease.

Northeasterners weigh in: how do you feel your communities are handling the Lyme Disease problem?

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