Beyond Genetics: Gut Bacteria Impact Asthma

December 11, 2017

When you inherit asthma, it may not (just) be the genes you’re getting (or not). It may be mom’s bacteria that influences if, and how bad, babies have asthma. Babies with asthma have lower levels of good gut bacteria, and even more so if mom was overweight or had allergies, too.

Good bacteria don’t just protect our gastrointestinal tract and aid digestion, they can influence mood, heart health, and the immune system beyond the gut. Researchers are digging in and finding more ways that good bacteria influence not just our health, but who we are. And it’s not just the gut. Colonies of good bacteria (and good viruses, it turns out) exist in other places on the body, too, keeping out pathogens and influencing the way our body works.

To have good bacteria, you need good habits. Good bacteria make exercise, nutrients, and sleep more effective, while bad bacteria can sabotage your efforts (impacting calorie and nutrient use/absorption). So not only are habits like exercising important, they’re exponential as your bacterial colony changes, and the same goes for bad habits!

You can move things along in the right direction by supporting your bacterial colonies with an influx of good bacteria from a probiotic supplement like Flora MGR, or from probiotic rich foods (fermented foods like yogurt, kefir, and some canned foods).

Can good bacteria impact your asthma as an adult? There’s no research on the subject. It can only help, though, since having a robust colony of good bacteria has been shown to improve the immune system, and to benefit all sorts of different aspects of health. Try adding a probiotic to your diet and see what improves after a couple weeks or months.

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