Do Antibiotics Lead to Colon Cancer?

August 21, 2019

With many studies having previously made a weak connection between cancer and antibiotics, researchers dug through a deep database to see if they could find evidence that ties the use of antibiotics to cancer. Even when used years in the past, it appears there’s a connection between colon cancer and antibiotics. Conversely, antibiotics may lower rectal cancer risk.

Tentative research isn’t a reason to not take antibiotics, but paired with other problems like antibiotic resistance, it’s a good reason to make sure you need them (for example, antibiotics are commonly prescribed for sinus infections even though they are not usually bacterial).

What can you do about a possible connection between colon cancer and antibiotics? Support your gut health! 

Start with probiotics like Flora MGR. We now know that hosting a colony of good bacteria is paramount to our health, and that antibiotics kill off those good bacteria. Taking probiotics and eating probiotic rich foods can help restore them.

Nothing is automatic—so tip the odds in your favor by supporting colon health in other ways, too. Exercise is associated with a lower risk of cancer and colon cancer in particular. Produce heavy diets with lots of fiber and antioxidants also help support colon health, lowering the risk of colon cancer. And don’t ignore family history—if you’ve got colon cancer in your family tree, start screening earlier, stay on top of it, and prioritizing supporting your gut health.

The good news is that knowing risks, like the link between antibiotics and colon cancer, means we can take action. Build a lifestyle of healthy habits, and add supplement support like probiotics to your diet. With a large variety of beneficial bacteria, it’s a good way to support and replenish our guts.

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: