Managing Asthma Symptoms

August 12, 2013

InhalerWhile you’re stuck with asthma until science discovers a cure (probably not any time soon), you don’t have to be stuck with asthma symptoms.

The root cause of asthma is inflammation. But on a daily basis, asthma symptoms are triggered by any number of things: exercise, cold air, smog, cigarette smoke (even second hand), pet dander, certain foods and medicines…

The first step is talking to your doctor about your asthma symptoms. Unmanaged asthma can be life threatening, so make sure you know which medications will work for you in an emergency. If it’s your child with asthma, then make sure you have a clear, written plan for anyone left in charge of the child’s care, and talk to your child so they know what to expect.

It’s up to you to figure out what causes the wheezing, coughing, and loss of breath that asthma symptoms bring. If you have mild asthma, it might just be some of these things, while severe asthma might encompass all of them and more.

Allergens are common asthma triggers. Allergens are their own category to sort out. Different people will react to different things.

If you want a more natural asthma action plan, you’ll have to be extra proactive—do and be ready with everything your doctor recommends, and add some extra, preventative measures.

Try Buteyko Breathing. It will help you take control, although it isn’t a cure. As a complementary treatment, the aid it brings can help with secondary symptoms that asthma sufferers often have—namely, anxiety and depression. By being proactive, it will help you with some of the issues asthma symptoms can bring.

Take care of yourself! Once asthma symptoms are under control, talk to your doctor about an exercise program. And don’t forget to eat well! While you might be avoiding trigger foods, try adding support foods. Since inflammation is the underlying cause, support your body with plenty of antioxidants.

Finally, sinus infections are more common for many people with asthma. Make sure you work to prevent them—a daily sinus rinse, care about where you swim, etc.

What’s your asthma action plan?

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