Turn the Heat Up on High Blood Pressure

September 26, 2018

A bigger study supports an old conclusion: colder temperatures cause higher blood pressure. Previous smaller/less thorough studies have turned up evidence that turning down the thermostat may be turning your blood pressure up—but new, more thorough research hits it home: for every degree colder it is, blood pressure measurably goes up.

The effect is enough that doctors ought to consider the temperature of a patient’s home, especially for borderline cases. They might consider that the more severely ill may need their medications adjusted based on the temperature of their home. After all, researchers think that the link between indoor temperature and blood pressure may be at least partially responsible for the spike in strokes and other cardiac events in the winter.

There’s more—not everyone is equally affected. People who exercise more don’t experience the same bump in blood pressure when things get cold (maybe a stronger heart means better circulation, and higher efficiency without blood pressure rising?). So if you want to protect yourself against the office thermostat or a trip to a three hour movie (especially one whose plot might make your blood pressure jump a few times), start slow on adding exercise to your day.

Researchers didn’t conclude that there’s any perfect temperature, but recommend keeping things at least at 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

In addition to exercising and adjusting your thermostat, you can support a healthier blood pressure with other good habits, like eating right. And go above and beyond—make sure you get herbal and nutritional support for you circulatory system each day with Cardio CVS Complete.

Share your thoughts in the comments:

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: