The High Nutritional Value of Colorful Foods

July 26, 2016

Ripe Red TomatoYou might already know that a good way to find the most nutrient rich foods is to look for rich, deep color, a good smell, and, of course, a rich taste. That can apply to supplements, too. The plant ingredients in Welltrient supplements are selected only if they’re a fresh green and not a wilted brown, and Deep Ocean Krill Oil is a superior source of EPA and DHA than fish oils, and one of the reasons it’s better is its red color, which comes from the antioxidant Astaxanthin.

But let’s jump back to how color, and red in particular, signifies nutrient richness. In modern culture, tomatoes and Italy go hand in hand. Almost every Italian restaurant has its own version of a traditional red sauce; but tomatoes have only been in Italy a few hundred years. In fact, they’re a New World crop, and early Europeans gave them a wide-berth. After all, giant red “berries” often signal-danger, or poison. That’s half true: tomatoes belong in the solanaceous family and their greens are poisonous, but their fruits are nutritious, and studies have found lots of significant correlations to health benefits.

In fact, Lycopene, which contributes to the red color of tomatoes, is one of the nutrients that has a lot of great studies under its belt. It’s also found in watermelons. Without Lycopene to give them that rich red color that signifies sweet juice and summer, they turn a white-ish yellow and their flavor drops to a more bland sweetness.

See how it works? The same generalization works when you’re comparing fish oil to krill oil. Krill oil is more sustainably harvested, and those techniques combined with the powerful antioxidant Astaxanthin means that krill oil holds up much better getting from the ocean to you. Fish oil, meanwhile, is less sustainable and requires additives to stabilize its shelf life. Fish oil is more difficult to digest, often resulting in discomfort that manifests itself for everyone around you as it comes back up in the form of a “fish burp”.

Switch today to the visibly better choice: Deep Ocean Krill Oil.

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