Health Institutions Using Silver To Prevent HAIs

August 2, 2011

Silver may be a star at preventing HIAs.

Hospital acquired infections (HAIs) kill thousands of patients yearly. Whether it’s CRKP, MRSA, or a more benign infection, health centers are tightening their hygiene practices (which dramatically decrease infection rates).

Leading the front of improved hospital hygiene is colloidal silver. If you’re a regular reader you already know that it’s now being used on catheters, glass, and other instruments. In the next few years, hospital sheets, gowns, bed rails, and other surfaces will likely also have a nano silver coating.
Silver fights bacteria and other pathogens, and has been used for centuries to preserve food, as a dietary supplement, and even in modern medicine (on newborns, for instance). Although silver, and colloidal silver in particular, has struggled for main-stream acceptance over the last two decades, the failure of antibiotics and rise of new superbugs is making many main-stream institutions turn to silver to prevent infection.

Unfortunately, it will still be a few years before colloidal silver, (or non-ionized nano silver) is accepted within hospitals. Many of the studies that have shown nano silver may do everything from fight infections to kill breast cancer cells and reduce atherosclerosis, still need to be tested further, put into clinical trials, and studied under a microscope. Other studies are already looking at the efficacy of different types of silver, including ionic vs. non-ionic (colloidal) silver.

Regardless of how soon science discovers the benefits (or lack thereof) of colloidal silver, you can still buy it as a safe dietary supplement.

How do you think colloidal silver will come into mainstream acceptance?

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