Travel Safely This Holiday Season

October 21, 2014

TravellerIf you’ll be travelling this holiday season, refresh yourself on safety and health tips to ensure a successful journey.

Before You Leave

-Tech up—have checks direct deposited, and bills on autopay, so they won’t be sitting in your mailbox.
-Use timers for lights, your TV, and your lawn to make it appear you’re still home. Turn the ringer on your phone down.

Managing Health Conditions

You have to keep medications in their original containers—so it’s a good idea to just keep them on you. Although I’m usually for checking as much as possible and being a minimalist while going through security, you don’t want to risk a lost bag and missing a dosage or some pain pills going missing.

On Medications:

-Keep your bag neatly organised, there’s a good chance it will be inspected.
-Keep doctors notes and any additional documentation with the medication.
-You may have to check your supplements, especially any liquids (like colloidal silver). There are different levels of zealousness among security agents, and plenty of ridiculous stories still get reported.

Be Prepared:

-Talk to your doctor and make sure you’re cleared for travel. Sometimes you shouldn’t go far if you have a condition that needs close monitoring. Or you can’t sit for prolonged periods when taking certain medications. Other medications may make driving unsafe. Let your doctor know you travel plans, and follow their advice, which may mean staying put.
-Familiarize yourself with local hospitals before you go. Is one better prepared than another to treat you and your specific condition?
-Have your doctor’s number with you, as well as a summary of your condition, any allergies, and current treatment plan.

Avoid Getting Sick

-Vacations often mean abandoning exercise and taking a break from healthy eating, so at least be sure to keep your immune support up—pack your daily multivitamin, and maybe bring along an Immune Booster Pack just in case.

-Research where you’re going. Remember that Florida is tropical, that disease carrying mosquitoes have spread pretty far north, and that the south has more bugs and parasites. On the other hand, the north can be really cold, and you should be especially careful if you’re driving (and if you’re flying, be prepared for delays and bring extra medication).

-While most people are worried about other’s bodily fluids, be careful of your own, too. There have been a few cases, some absent minded, some malicious, where security got in a kerfuffle and there was mild panic over spit or regular food-poisoning level vomit. Don’t make tomorrow’s headlines!

-When you arrive, check where the fire exit is. Know how many doors are between you and it in case there’s too much smoke to see.

-Practice situational awareness so you stay safe. Usually that means avoiding pickpockets and other trouble, these days it also means watching for people who show signs of sickness—fatigue, sweat/fever, red eyes, coughing and sneezing, etc. You don’t have to form an angry mob, just carefully avoid them.

-And beware of spreading your own illness. Ebola isn’t the only disease that becomes contagious with a fever. Cough and sneeze into your elbow and lay low if you get sick. Remember that symptom suppressing medications don’t stop the disease or transmission.

And of course, enjoy your trip!

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