There are lots of cultures built around tea, and they offer some wonderful tea habits to stick into our own day. Tea, especially something healthy like our caffeine-free Jiaoguolan, can be a healthy addition to your day in and of itself, or it can be a substitute for coffee if you’re trying to cut caffeine.

Why cut caffeine? As a staple, it doesn’t get the credit it deserves for how it can create subtle disruptions in our lives. A daily coffee/caffeine boost can take over our circadian rhythms and contribute to insomnia and restless leg syndrome, stress, migraines, and more. Enjoy coffee occasionally, but consider switching to Jiaogulan or another tea for your morning cup or afternoon boost. It doesn’t jump you up like caffeine, but the warmth and break can refocus and reboot your day. It’s a soothing start rather than a jolt. Read more about Jiaogulan…

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The rabbit hole of research into the good bacteria that make up your gut is getting deeper. There’s a strong link between what bacteria (and in what proportions) are in your gut and chronic fatigue syndrome. In fact, the link is clear enough that the research may lead to a better diagnostic tool by allowing doctors to profile gut bacteria (even matching it to the almost 50% of chronic fatigue patients who have IBS).

Will this lead to a cure for those with chronic fatigue syndrome? The official answer is correlation doesn’t equal causation, meaning more research is needed (you have to rule out that it’s not chronic fatigue syndrome causing a shift in gut bacteria rather than gut bacteria causing chronic fatigue syndrome). Read more about chronic fatigue syndrome…

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Summer is just around the corner, so whether you’re staying put, traveling domestically or internationally, have a few plans or no plans, make sure you’re ready to go!

Start by kicking that lingering cough or runny nose. This winter was full of illness, and for some parts of the country, colds are still flaring up with the weather. Make sure you’re getting extra immune support to help dry up your respiratory system. Read more about summer prep…

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While a small part of the rise in Hepatitis C (HCV) is probably due to newly diagnosed Baby Boomers, who were exposed more than other generations and are at an age where the incubation of Hep C is causing symptoms to appear, experts are attributing most of the 300 fold rise to the current opioid epidemic.

Unlike HIV, Hep C isn’t deterred as much by needle exchanges. It’s actually very virulent, with a very small number of viruses needed for transmission. That means that an imperceptible amount of blood can transmit it to the tiniest of wounds in the skin (things like sharing toothbrushes, razors, or in the case of drug use, it can go from needle to shared spoon to needle, or travel on a cotton ball). Being highly transmissible means that over time, this is a huge risk increase for everyone. For instance, more people with Hep C will likely mean a higher risk of hospital transmission from hospital errors and negligence. Read more about Hep C…

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It’s one of those things that seems obvious, but a study to back up the claim helps. Stress, according to a new study, changes how the gut works. You want your gut to be semi-permeable, but stress changes things so there’s more leakage of nutrients, more pathogens getting through, an increase in inflammation, and more symptoms like diarrhea (and it changes the composition of your good gut bacteria, too). While the study focused on measuring physical stress, psychological stress can be presumed (and might be something more people are familiar with). Read more about stress and gut health…

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