Choosing A Colloidal Silver: What To Look For

July 8, 2010

A colloid is any solid suspended in a liquid, true colloidal silver consists of silver particles suspended in water. However, not all “colloidal” silver brands define ‘silver particles’ the same way–some use ‘ionic silver’ interchangeably with ‘silver particles’. Further, of those that have true silver particles, not all achieve the same minute size as brands such as Mesosilver at Colloids For Life (the smaller the size the more surface area/effectiveness). But how can you tell which products are true colloidal silver? It’s actually rather simple.

Ionic Silver

Ionic silver is a silver particle that is missing an electron, and so it has a charge. Most ions want to have a complete set of paired electrons, and so they will seek to form a bond with other atoms or molecules that have the corresponding charge. When ionic silver enters the human body, it is able to quickly find a match, forming a silver compound, such as silver chloride, which is expelled from the body as waste.

Ionic silver is more easily produced then colloidal silver, and so many products try to sell it as equal to true colloidal silver. It can be easily identified in two ways:

  1. Color. Silver Particles, in true colloidal silver, are suspended in water, causing light to be blocked and reflect the dark grey-blue color of a true silver colloid. Ionic silver dissolves in water the same way as sugar or salt does, so that it’s clear.
  2. Further, you can easily make ionic silver content visible at home. When table salt (sodium chloride/NaCl) is added to a sample of any colloidal silver product, the sodium and chlorine will dissolve into their respective ions. Any ionic silver will then bond with the chlorine ion forming a cloud of silver chloride. Keep adding salt until the cloud is as big as it will get, and you’ll have an idea of how much ionic content is present. The majority of “colloidal silver” products are about 90% ionic content, Mesosilver at Colloids for Life has only 15% ionic silver. Any brand you consider should report how much of it’s product is ionic. Not reporting this, or using it interchangeably (reporting total silver concentration, rather than actual colloidal concentration), is a red flag.

Particle Surface Area

Particle surface area is the best way to compare colloidal silver products. Surface area is theorized as having a direct correspondence to the efficacy of colloidal silver (how well it’s able to interact with its environment). Particle surface area is based on silver particle size and silver particle concentration (it doesn’t count silver ions, which are rendered inert upon contact with an ion of opposite charge, as discussed above). When compared to other brands, Mesosilver has the highest surface area, meaning it’s the most effective at interacting with it’s environment. This also means that you’re getting the most for your dollar, Mesosilver has three times the surface area as the next leading brand, and more than 2.5 times the value!

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