Diabetes – Are you at Risk?

January 20, 2010

There are an estimated 5.7 million people with undiagnosed diabetes living in the United States. Although genetics play a huge role in developing diabetes, it is almost always triggered by an environmental factor. If you think that you’re at risk for diabetes and want to make changes to your lifestyle to help prevent the onset of diabetes, there are a number of steps that research suggests may help reduce environmental triggers.

About Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes often occurs during childhood, which is why it is sometimes termed childhood or juvenile diabetes. After it’s onset, the body has an autoimmune reaction that requires a regular dose of insulin be taken.

Type 2 diabetes, like type 1, is heavily influenced by genetics. The more immediate relatives you have with diabetes the more likely it is that you will develop it. However, type 2 diabetes is also notoriously linked to being overweight and making poor lifestyle choices. Although this is partially true, the genetic link is still the primary factor while lifestyle choices merely act as a trigger. Type 2 diabetes can be managed more easily if it is caught early, your doctor will talk to you about what steps to take and medications that may help renew your cells’ sensitivity to insulin. It is often a progressive disease, so it’s best to make lifestyle decisions that delay its onset or slow its progress.

Symptoms of Diabetes

  • Pre-Type 2 diabetes, you can have high blood glucose levels for years before it’s onset. If you’re concerned that you’re at a genetic risk for diabetes, talk to your doctor about regularly testing your blood glucose levels.
  • Frequent urination (it won’t be proportionate to what you drink)
  • Increased thirst
  • Increased hunger
  • Changes in vision/blurry vision. This is caused by prolonged high glucose levels affecting the shape of your eye-vision often returns to normal once you are able to maintain control of you blood glucose levels.
  • Breath smelling of acetone
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Altered mental state (fits of anger, fatigue, etc.)
  • In severe cases, coma

These symptoms develop rapidly before the onset of type 1 diabetes but often develop gradually, if they’re noticed at all, before the onset of type 2 diabetes.

How to Maintain A Healthy Lifestyle

Firstly, maintain a healthy lifestyle. Avoid heavy drinking, smoking, and eat a healthy diet. A healthy diet should be low in processed sugars and trans fats, and instead should include whole grains and unsaturated fats. Sugar is often overly associated with diabetes, when it’s actually okay for a diabetic person to eat sugar so long as it’s part of an overall healthy diet. Take a supplement to make sure your body’s getting all of its nutrients so that you maintain optimum health. A good all-around multi-vitamin is Welltrient One, which contains not only vitamins and minerals, but enzymes, antioxidants, and super foods. Also add a supplement that will help to manage your insulin levels, such as Glycemic MGRx.and Thyroid MGRx. In addition to regulating absorbtion of sugar in the intestine, they may even help to rebuild and heal pancreatic tissue.

Make an effort to exercise everyday, at least two and a half hours a week. Even a brisk walk will help your body and will help you maintain a healthy weight.

Inflammation can affect cells in such a way that they develop resistance, so fight inflammation with an immune system boosting supplement such as Mesosilver, which works with your immune system to fight pathogens on contact (preventing or fighting inflammation and infections, which can often be a trigger of Type 1 diabetes).

Although there’s no guarantee in preventing the onset of diabetes due to the genetic factors, you can certainly reduce environmental risks and triggers as well as keep yourself healthy with natural treatments if you already have diabetes.

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