Colloidal Silver Lab Tests Vs. Reality

January 25, 2012

One of the more common (and more reasonable) critiques of colloidal silver is that the only real tests performed on the products sold as colloidal silver are done in a lab, in test tubes and petri dishes. The concern being that it may react differently in the body—something may prevent it from working, or it may be bad for human health in some unknown way, the underlying concern being a cry of we just don’t know!

Of course, this argument ignores the broad and long history of colloidal silver. It’s impossible to say how many Americans currently support their immune system with colloidal silver (or some silver water variant like ionic silver, which can be made by home silver generators without any statistics reported), but it’s at least in the tens of thousands, if not more.

That’s (at least) tens of thousands of people who haven’t turned blue. Tens of thousands who have overwhelmingly positive things to say about colloidal silver. Tens of thousands who haven’t landed in the hospital from some sort of silver caused problem.


It’s important to note that not one of those testimonials—the lack of silver water-induced kidney failure, the lack of a colony of blue men and blue women, the overwhelming stories of improved health—count. The tests required to validate colloidal silver require (minimally) hundreds of millions of dollars, and at least a decade of different tests. (Of course, even when mainstream medications undergo this rigorous testing they can still fail miserably and result in a recall—only after the deaths pile up, of course).

Equally important, the history of colloidal silver isn’t completely ignored by all of its opponents. Its existence in America today comes from it’s historical use—it’s sort of grandfathered in as a supplement (Like asprin! A drug researcher once told me asprin would never pass today).

So the critics bottom line? Colloidal silver is guilty until proven innocent. It’s a policy that does mitigate liability, but it also ignores the many studies that have failed to prove ill affect (but weren’t big enough!) or showed something positive.

So, what’s your Silver Story?

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