Brain Amoeba Propagates, Despite Initial Claims

October 19, 2012

When the brain eating amoeba, Naegleria Fowleri, killed a Florida teen two summers ago, scientists rushed to keep the public from panicking. It’s rare, they said. It happens maybe once or twice a century, and only if conditions are just right.

Blame global warming, or pollution (including the medicines & pathogens regularly thrown into our sewage and landfills), the increase in population or the spread of information, but there have far more cases than was initially promised.

In the US, at least two people died this summer after contracting Naegleria Fowleri symptoms from their own tap water. And in Pakistan, more than ten died the same way, causing officials in South Asia to reevaluate water safety (adding more chlorine) and to spread public awareness about the dangers of lake and tap water getting up your nose.

Naegleria Fowleri symptoms are fast acting, and if not caught early will lead to death within a week. What are Naegleria Fowleri symptoms?: fever, headache, nausea and vomiting, and possibly a stiff neck.

To contract Naegleria Fowleri symptoms, you have to get water up your nose where it can easily reach the brain from the sinuses. People who have died from Naegleria Fowleri have either been swimming in lakes or rivers, where water can easily get up the nose, or have intentionally put water up their nose as part of sinus flooding.

To avoid brain eating amoeba, avoid putting tap or free running water up your nose. Use boiled (and cooled, obviously) water for sinus rinses, or use a naturally anti-pathogenic vehicle to clean your sinuses, such as colloidal silver.

Cleaning out water heaters and other water storage around your home can help keep Naegleria Fowleri out, but isn’t a guarantee (the two who died in the south had the amoeba in their heaters and coming from their taps, but it wasn’t found in the municipal water supply—how it got into their homes is a mystery!).

In general, only warmer climates, like the South, support the growth of Naegleria Fowleri. But then, there have been so many more cases than we were told to expect, I wouldn’t flush tap water up my nose no matter where I lived.

Do you rinse your sinuses?  What’s your routine—boiled water, colloidal silver, or other?

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